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Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Guv Signs Corbett's E-Cigarette Bill

FLURRY OF SIGNED BILLS FLY FROM GUV'S DESK; THREE AUTHORED BY HAYASHI
By Steven Tavares

Selling so-called electronic cigarettes to adolescents is now against the law Monday night after Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed state Sen. Ellen Corbett's high-profile bill into law. E-cigarettes are often laced with fruity flavorings and marketed to teenagers in convenience stores and sales carts located in shopping malls.

The device, which looks like a cigarette, produces a smokeless form of nicotine through individually-purchased cartridges. E-cigarettes are not regulated the Food and Drug Administration, which led to Corbett's SB 882. An initial fine of $200 may be levied for selling the device to those under 18 years of age and up to $1,000 for a third offense. A bill, written by Corbett, strengthening existing state law against producing toxic toys was also signed by the governor.

Schwarzenegger vetoed three bills authored by Corbett including one that would have set up a pilot program at three state universities allowing students to submit absentee ballots on campus instead of an election day precinct and another ensuring government procurement contracts were certified to be produced without slave labor. "I believe this bill could further compromise the business environment in California during difficult times for many businesses in this state," the governor reasoned in the veto statement. In addition, he vetoed a bill establishing a regional council charged with establishing a recovery plan in the event of a catastrophic earthquake or other disaster

In addition, to scurrying at the capitol to resolve the longest-running budget impasse in state history, the governor was slated to sign or veto nearly 500 bills by the Thursday deadline. Monday night, Schwarzenegger signed 102 bills into law, while vetoing 37.

Assemblywoman Mary Hayashi also had three bills approved by the governor Monday night. One establishes state license plate adorned with a design honoring prisoners of war and another to designate excess tax liabilities toward the Police Activities League. Another Hayashi bill, AB 2104, will allow for the state board of pharmacy to appoint its own executive officer with the approval of the director of Consumer Affairs.

13 comments :

The third message from heaven...

If any man worship the beast and his image, and receive his mark in his forehead, or in his hand, The same shall drink of the wine of the wrath of God, which is poured out without mixture into the cup of his indignation; and he shall be tormented with fire and brimstone in the presence of the holy angels, and in the presence of the Lamb: And the smoke of their torment ascendeth up for ever and ever: and they have no rest day nor night, who worship the beast and his image, and whosoever receiveth the mark of his name.

Do not let your hearts be troubled. Trust in God; trust also in me. In my Father's house are many rooms; if it were not so, I would have told you. I am going there to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back and take you to be with me that you also may be where I am.

WTF Mary? What are you doing in Sacramento anyways! Nothing apparently. Way to go, I guess Tavares is right about you.

Looks like Scary Mary secured herself a future job...she'll need something to do in 2012.

Anybody know the fine for selling regular cigarettes to minors?

Feel good legislation.

Fines range from $200 to $1,000.

Question is, are e-cigarettes bad for your health compared to ACTUAL cigarettes? Kids still get a hold of ACTUAL cigarettes, no matter what law you pass.

Next she'll want to ban bubble gum cigarettes!

No public agency should be involved in the policing of this law. Sales of cigarettes to minors is not what police and sheriffs should be doing. Cigarettes and all tobacco products should be taxed to the max.

Isn't it the ATF's job to enforce this on a federal level?

There is nothing in the bill about who will enforce this...so I suppose...counties & cities?

Also, fines paid will not go to schools, as they usually do.

" The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local
agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the
state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that
reimbursement.

This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this
act for a specified reason."

Violations of 308, selling to a minor are just violations and not federal offenses. These violations are not what the police and sheriff should be working on. They ought to be working on crimes against people, not on fines that reimburse the government. Nanny laws like this are a joke.

I agree with you...wow, shocking :)

But ya know, the politicians think passing these kinds of laws are a good thing, especially during an election.

I think that the laws on tobacco go back to Ronald Reagan at the time when the state was concerned with having a uniform code of crime. No one really ever voted on this. That is what the problem is, we have way too many laws and rules.

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