Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Pivotal Raiders Corporate Event Last Month Seen As Unsuccessful

COLISEUM AUTHORITY//RAIDERS | The Raiders and the National Football League said lagging corporate support in the East Bay is hampering the team's bottom line. So, the Coliseum Joint Powers Authority (JPA) led by Alameda County Supervisor Nate Miley moved to fill the deficiency with a corporate event at Raiders headquarters in Alameda featuring local politicians and past heroes of the silver and black.

However, some officials tell The Citizen the event held last month  was ineffective and failed to entice a strong showing of the region's corporate heavyweights willing to aligned themselves with the team and its quest for a new stadium in Oakland.

It's one of the reasons why Save Oakland Sports, an advocacy groups hoping to keep the city's three professional sports teams in town gathered Monday at the den of Raiders fans, Ricky's Sports Theatre in San Leandro to discuss plans for their own event to draw the attention of the Chevrons, Cloroxs and Oracles in the Bay Area.

Rumors of the Raiders possibly returning to Los Angeles have periodically percolated in the press, while a conceit over the past few month floated by the team's ownership urging the city, county and its fans to line up corporate sponsorships for the team to be viable in Oakland along with a new stadium to replace the aging Coliseum, have placed greater urgency on the subject. In addition, the Raiders, like the A's, both have leases at the ballpark expiring at the end of their respective seasons.

The uncertainty over the Raiders has its notoriously faithful and rabid fans parsing every single words coming out of team management's mouth. Tom Blanda, a Raiders executive who attended Monday's meeting, said to the delight of the group, "We want the Raiders in Oakland." Later, when Blanda announced the team would donate 800 tickets per game this season for Oakland students, he added, the number of free tickets could rise in each of the next two years. A Raiders fan with exceptional listening skills quickly jumped on Blanda's words indicating the team's planning process in Oakland goes beyond this season.

Government, however, moves at a glacial pace. While the Coliseum Authority, which runs the facility, acknowledges the need to replace the stadium built in 1966, how it will be funded is a major question. Similar to comments made by Raiders owner Mark Davis to the Oakland Tribune over the weekend, Blanda says time is of the essence. "Help us create a sense of urgency," said Blanda. "What we need the politicians to understand is that we're running out of time. Tell them now is the time to rally."

The Authority is scheduled to meet Sept. 20 to unveil specifics from an Authority-funded study into building a new stadium at the current Coliseum property. Preliminary findings released last month found a 56,000-seat open-air football stadium could cost upwards of $1 billion based upon new facilities currently being built in Minneapolis and Atlanta, among others. However, the Raiders and the NFL also have their own study over the feasibility of a new stadium for the team in Oakland. A scenario whereby any positive findings in the Authority's report could be blunted by less-than-stellar prospects in the team's findings is something one JPA board member understands could occur.

Coliseum Authority board member Chris Dobbins said Monday night, "We know that could happen, but we have to stick to our stated goal, we want them to stay." He reiterated local officials need to feel a sense of urgency for moving forward with a specific stadium plan in light of Davis's public opposition to signing another short-term lease at the Coliseum without a plan for new stadium in place.

The Save Oakland Sports group hopes to hold their own corporate event sometime in November. In the meantime, its members sounded unified in showing the team their willingness to gather strong support in the business community. Dr. Death, a particularly passionate Raiders fan, even for the infamously loyal tribe, and one who travelled from Sacramento for Monday's meeting, said fans need to be highly proactive or risk losing the Raiders. With tinges of locker room bravado, Dr. Death added, "I don't take what's given to me, I take what I want."


It will be a sad day for the entire Bay Area when/if the A's and Raiders no longer call Oakland home. This is not an economical or even sports world comment, strictly an emotional thought stemming from nearly 5 decades of memories.

Not a sports fan and could care less. SF will be better off with the Santa Clara 49ers. Candlestick will be demolished and life will go on. Coliseum will be demolished and replaced by retail-residential and life will go on, too.

Sorry, but just can't excited by this.

Do people realize how many jobs sports teams in Oakland create? Retail on 66th? You gotta be kidding? I work on 66th, not a huge retail area. This isn't SF. This is East Oakland. People don't go to East Oakland to see the lights and buildings and spend money. People either live here or come for their sports teams. I know many people who will be out of work if the As/Raiders/Warriors move out. Hotels will lose money. Gas stations will lose money. Fast food/restaurants will lose money. Anyone who cares about what's best for Oakland cares what happens to these teams. @510Campbell

True. But the same will be so where ever they end up. Prosperity and job opportunities will follow in the new locations.

Pretty selfish to look at it only in terms of Oakland only, if you ask me. Not a persuasive argument.

Business is business.

9:44 probably lives in Dublin. Keep clogging up our freeways and building cookie cutter homes and big boxe strip malls. Add to the sprawl that is the Bay Area.

It's selfish to think of only Oakland? That is the oddest comment I've ever read. No city in its right mind lets job and revenue creating business up and leave without at least trying to get them to stay. No Mayor wakes up and says, "Oh, big economic force is leaving... well, good for the other city!" All cities try to attract and keep businesses. That's how it works. Keeping the teams in Oakland is what is good for Oakland. So, yes, Oakland should try to keep them there.

Yes job opportunities will follow in new locations. That is good for that city, but its not what is good for Oakland.

I know not everyone cares about what is good for Oakland. They don't have to. But I do and I think a lot of others do also.


ICC Mortgage And financial Services,Is a sincere and certified private Loan company approved by the Government,we give out international and local loans to all countries in the world,Amount given out $2,500 to $100,000,000 Dollars, Euro and Pounds.We offer loans with a dependable guarantee to all of our clients. Our loan interest rates are very low and affordable with a negotiable duration.
Available now
Available now..
Apply for a loan today with your loan amount and duration, Its Easy and fast to get. 4% interest rates and monthly
installment payments.

Dawn Martin

Post a Comment