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Thursday, December 8, 2016

As Hayward’s $25 million education grant winds down, future funding is uncertain

Hayward Councilmember Al Mendall suggested
the future administrative costs for Hayward 
Promise Neighborhood was deliberately omitted.
HAYWARD CITY COUNCIL |
The Hayward Promise Neighborhood program, born out of a 5-year, $25 million federal grant to improve education outcomes in Hayward’s impoverished Jackson Triangle neighborhood, is due to run out this month.

But the future of its programs and legacy appear uncertain after several Hayward councilmembers questioned whether the Hayward Promise Neighborhood (HPN) has provided sufficient data concerning its positive outcomes for students and their families in one of the city most poverty-stricken areas.

Hayward elected officials, added, any continuation of even a few of HPN’s programs appears unlikely due to continuing city budget uncertainty, while some questioned whether the city’s treasury should be tapped to fund a “gap year” for administrative costs while an additional round of grant funding is sought sometime during the last half of 2017.

The areas within Jackson Avenue, Whitman Road and Harder Road make up the Jackson Triangle. More than a dozen local agencies are involved in HPN, but its primary recipient is Cal State East Bay.

One requirement for applying for additional grant funding is the existence of an on-going administrative infrastructure, said Hayward City Manager Kelly McAdoo. “It’s a little bit of a cart and horse issue. If we stop funding those services we won’t be competitive for the grant, but then there’s a risk that we fund those services and we don’t get the grant,” she said.

The potential cost of funding a gap year for HPN may run between $90,000 and $150,000, said McAdoo. The costs appeared to worry some officials. Councilmember Al Mendall asserted the omission of costs to the city was deliberate.

Councilmember Marvin Peixoto said Monday’s work session presentation implied future funding for at least portions of HPN’s programs is forthcoming. “I’m going to need some more specifics before I totally buy-in to it,” he said. “I don’t get that clear an impression that that’s going to happen.”

No other Hayward official was more skeptical about the future of HPN more than Councilmember Sara Lamnin, who criticized the program's lack of data collection, although, she pledged an open mind when it comes to any forthcoming proposal. “I want to see the outcomes piece. I see a lot of data about participation. I see a lot of data about awareness and it’s lovely and it’s important," said Lamnin, "but how many grades challenged?”

Incremental growth is apparent, added, Lamnin, but still deficient. “But in the Jackson Triangle, did we move the needle in terms of the things that matter in the success of our students?” asked Lamnin.

Despite the council's reticence toward opening the city's purse strings for some the programs facilitated by HPN, several lauded its attempts for impacting students in the South Hayward neighborhood. Mayor Barbara Halliday said five years isn't enough time to completely turnaround the Jackson Triangle, but progress is being made.

“I am certain that we have changed the lives of some of the children in this area and if we continue to work together, we can make that number grow and we can be a better community,” said Halliday. However, she added, appropriating money from the general fund next year will be "very difficult."

14 comments:

  1. Hayward Promise Neighborhood program, what a joke. The 25 million dollar grant went to an army of consultants, blood-suckers and other low life's known as politicians. Most of the money went to people that don't even live in Hayward and not the Jackson Triangle - what a bunch of criminals politicians are.

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  2. Hayward Promise Neighborhood program, what a joke. The 25 million dollar grant went to an army of consultants, blood-suckers and other low life's known as politicians. Most of the money went to people that don't even live in Hayward and not the Jackson Triangle - what a bunch of criminals politicians are.

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  3. Very true! Whenever there is a program to help the children of Hayward there are always greedy people to take the money. The community is watching, do what is right!!

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  4. Half that 25 mil went straight to HUSD. Ask Dobbs how the money was spent.

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  5. How much of the 25 million dollars was wasted on sending Fran David, Halliday, Dobbs, parents, a few students and overpaid cityworker/cheerleader David Korth to Colorado to compete for the "All American City" title. Or Ray McDonald's speach to at risk youth and all the other poor choices that HPN and HUSD made? Why waste tax payers money on worthless ideas and concepts? City council is ridiculous. If they aren't trying to meddle in school board affairs, they are wasting grant money that was meant to help the kids. There's plenty of other poor areas in Hayward, besides The Jackson Truangle. Help all of the kids succeed for a change. Lack of documention of successes for this program means council would show its own stupidity for funding this usesless program. Bottom feeders and leeches are profitting from and JT residents are being used as pawns.Handing out fresh fruit and veggies while wearing college sweatshirts with councilman Salinas isn't going to improve students grades. It makes for expensive photo ops and it worked to glean votes for Hayward's Native Son.

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  6. City council should host fundraisers like they did for their Trash PAC school board candidates, only this time they can give it to the kids instead of paying for those junk mail flyers.

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  7. City council's grade changed from a D+ to an F-. The need to find out what Data done did with the M O N E Y.

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  8. Five years is not enough turnaround time to judge if HPN has done enough to improve things for The Jackson Triangle Kids. Barbara is right. Because her 12 years plus on city council hasn't been enough time for her to work at improving things for our community. She has been able to cry that she is "The Mayor!" Its been enough time to tax us up the ying yang, approve for a 60 million dollar library out of reach for residents on the South end of town and time for trips to China, Japan and Colorado. Not to mention the lack of rent control and all these new, expensive housing developments going up. Say hello to higher taxes and more of a drain on your utilities and city services. Lest we forget, more traffic. What would Hello Kitty say to Mickey Mouse? Maybe she'd ask why Hayward politicians are so clueless and corrupt.

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  9. Halliday said the economy is up and things were going great for Hayward. That was earlier this year, when there weren't a dozen homicides in Hayward. There's money in the budget for pet projects, pipe dreams and Tom Foolery. Don't gamble with our tax dollars, like Fran David did. She lost big time when the Redevelopment Agency funding was dropped and she urged council to rubber stamp everything she put before them. Even though there was a chance that funding for Redevelopment could be lost and the city (Tax Payers) would get stuck with the tab. So Fran gambled and lost. We had to pay up. Not only that, she retired from the city with a whopper raise. Proof that you can still be a screw up and keep your city job. The Wallet of The Bay.

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  10. By MW:

    Related to the above comments, and especially the first three, the real, primary, and main purpose of most government programs, and especially ones that require additional spending, is feeding a bunch of sleazy bloodsucking leeches who refer to themselves as "experts" and "consultants."

    And furthermore, even if every single one of us was even richer than Warren Buffett, and therefore had truly unlimited money to spend on whatever was the very latest garbage and nonsense from the liberals and the "experts," in the overwhelming majority of instances their programs do not improve things even a little bit, and in fact often make things worse.

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  11. Neighborhood Promises are meant to be broken.

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  12. Go ask Salinas where all that money went!!

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  13. If Hayward city council wants to improve the lives of all Hayward residents, then they should all step down. They neglect their duties to coach their school board candidate clowns while residents are being murdered. They freely award contracts to the Chief of Police's boyfriend and who knows what other con artists that surface when jobs need to go out for bid. No oversight, no common sense. They retain a drunken Fire Chief and support a disgraced lunatic School Superintendent who finally got fired. The School Board had the balls to oust Dobbs. Council could take a cue from the School Board. Contreras should have been fired and Chief Stuart too. Hayward corruption at its best.

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